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Mátyás hill cave

The capital of caves

Did you know that Budapest is also known as the capital of caves? The name is no coincidence, as the city is home to outstanding natural treasures, with more than 150 caves hidden in the depths of dolomite and limestone hills, forming a labyrinth of underground passages spanning 55 kilometres. In Budapest, you will find the country’s longest cave system, the Pál-völgyi Cave, which is about 31 kilometres long and reveals a magical world of stalactites and extraordinary rock formations that has remained unchanged for thousands of years.

Gain insight into the secrets of underground chambers and passages on the organized tours of the Duna-Ipoly National Park, where you can explore the mysterious passages of not only the Pál-völgyi Cave but also the Budai Castle Cave and Szemlő-hegyi Cave. Before or after the cave tour at Szemlő-hegyi Cave, be sure to dedicate time to explore the interactive exhibition, and it’s also worth discovering the Kőpark educational trail, showcasing Hungarian rocks, which is located above the Szemlő-hegyi Cave. If you are up for a bigger challenge, you can have a special adventure in the caves of Mátyás Hill and Solymári-ördöglyuk! In addition, the still-active Molnár János Cave is a thrill for divers.

The main guardian and showcase of Budapest’s natural treasures is the Duna-Ipoly National Park Directorate. On its website, you can find many exciting guided tours in addition to cave tours. More info at: www.dunaipoly.hu/en/

Szemlő-hegyi Cave

Sorrento cliffs

Budapest, naturally!

Hot springs, the Danube, romantic cliffs, floodplain forests, and rare animal species. All of these are among the natural treasures of the 150-year-old capital, and it’s worth exploring them on a hike!

Budapest is also characterized by its signifi cant connection to water. The city is rich in rivers, lakes and springs,and its world-famous thermal springs are the source of its spas: the Széchenyi, Rudas, Gellért, and Lukács Baths are defi nitely worth visiting. Before indulging in a relaxing bath, you can explore the Danube by canoe or kayak, or cycle along the Danube cycle path through the floodplain gallery forests.

In the midst of the urban jungle, it might be hard to imagine, but nearly 9 percent of Budapest’s territory is designated as national or local nature reserves. Within the city, you can discover stunning man-made parks, historic gardens, and arboretums, such as the ELTE Botanical Garden, Jókai Garden, or Soroksár Botanical Garden. The surrounding forests, wetlands, and swamps are home to rare plant and animal species, some of which bear the name of their origin, like the budai imola (Centaurea sadleriana), budai berkenye (Sorbus budaiana) or the budai nyúlfarkfű (Sesleria sadleriana).

Gain insight into the secrets of underground chambers and passages on the organized tours of the Duna-Ipoly National Park, where you can explore the mysterious passages of not only the Pál-völgyi Cave but also the Budai Castle Cave and Szemlő-hegyi Cave. Before or after the cave tour at Szemlő-hegyi Cave, be sure to dedicate time to explore the interactive exhibition, and it’s also worth discovering the Kőpark educational trail, showcasing Hungarian rocks, which is located above the Szemlő-hegyi Cave. If you are up for a bigger challenge, you can have a special adventure in the caves of Mátyás Hill and Solymári-ördöglyuk! In addition, the still-active Molnár János Cave is a thrill for divers.

Szemlő-hegyi Cave

The main guardian and showcase of Budapest’s natural treasures is the Duna-Ipoly National Park Directorate. On its website, you can find many exciting guided tours in addition to cave tours. More info at: www.dunaipoly.hu/en/

Budapest, naturally!

Hot springs, the Danube, romantic cliffs, floodplain forests, and rare animal species. All of these are among the natural treasures of the 150-year-old capital, and it’s worth exploring them on a hike!

Budapest is also characterized by its signifi cant connection to water. The city is rich in rivers, lakes and springs,and its world-famous thermal springs are the source of its spas: the Széchenyi, Rudas, Gellért, and Lukács Baths are defi nitely worth visiting. Before indulging in a relaxing bath, you can explore the Danube by canoe or kayak, or cycle along the Danube cycle path through the fl oodplain gallery forests.

Sorrento cliffs

In the midst of the urban jungle, it might be hard to imagine, but nearly 9 percent of Budapest’s territory is designated as national or local nature reserves. Within the city, you can discover stunning man-made parks, historic gardens, and arboretums, such as the ELTE Botanical Garden, Jókai Garden, or Soroksár Botanical Garden. The surrounding forests, wetlands, and swamps are home to rare plant and animal species, some of which bear the name of their origin, like the budai imola (Centaurea sadleriana), budai berkenye (Sorbus budaiana) or the budai nyúlfarkfű (Sesleria sadleriana).

Walking tours in Budapest

Cycling tours in Budapest

Water tours in Budapest

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